Loy

Pat Loy Radio Interview

We have been fortunate that we have had so much support from our community. Our education has to this point, been a no-cost program its volunteers. We have computers that have been donated.
— Pat Loy, Longtime Volunteer Teacher of Continuing Education/ GED, September 2019 Radio Interview .

The following is a transcription of a radio broadcast featuring Pat Loy, Albany Helping Hands, GED/ Continuing Education Volunteer. The interview, conducted by Jim Willhight, AHH Development, and Media Consultant airs on Monday, September 9, 2019, from 9:30 to 10:00 am on 1580 AM, KGAL and KGAL.com. The to listen to the interview (Podcast audio in the form of an mp3 file) is available by clicking here.

Jim Willhight: Good morning, 1580. KGAL, Jim Willhight. It's Valley Talk. Joining us this morning for Albany Helping Hands is Pat Loy. Good morning Pat.

Pat Loy: Good morning.

Jim Willhight: So Pat you are what we call at the Shelter the GED teacher, but you do a whole lot more than that to tell us a little bit about yourself.

Pat Loy: Actually they call me the GED teacher but I really teach anything that anyone needs to work on academically.

I've taught for a long time, and I've taught all grades I've taught in Los Angeles and Colorado, and I taught in juvenile court schools in Los Angeles, and I've been here for about ten years now. I love it.

My first year was the first and second grade in Colorado. That was, oh my goodness, 1974.

Pat Loy, longtime Albany Helping Hands Volunteer Teacher of Continuing Education/ GED.

Pat Loy, longtime Albany Helping Hands Volunteer Teacher of Continuing Education/ GED.

I think one of the important things that we do is address the needs that adults have for education and because our adults range in age from maybe 27, I had a student it was 80 years old, and they also have this range of experience and Knowledge and Skills.

So it non-traditional education and it requires flexibility so you don't go through a curriculum as you might in the public school K to 12 education. I think it is just necessary for adults who have those that variety of needs.

We also have to use practical strategies that make sense to an adult you can't use the kind of materials and instructional procedures that you would with younger people all the time.

I think also that adults are at this point they want to get their education, and they don't have a lot of extra time to do it.

They need to be efficient, so I try to integrate as much as possible. So if I'm doing Global Studies, I'm doing language arts at the same time. Reading, Writing, parts of speech that's sort of thing.

Jim Willhight: Kandice Williams is the guest services coordinator here at Albany Helping Hands Shelter. What she does is gets with each individual guest and determines their needs they have, if it's here at the Shelter, The Bailey Home or in Transitional Housing. Is it clothing? Is it education? Is it Social Security assistance? Is it help for medical assistance or perhaps navigating the mental health system. That is what Kandace does and a part of what you do as well. Let's discuss that.

Pat Loy: Networking is extremely important, and we do interact with the other agencies in the community. Because, for one thing, efficiency is important and economical responses to the needs that our people have here at the Shelter.

Old PC’s in Albany Helping Hands Computer Lab that are in need of replacement.

Old PC’s in Albany Helping Hands Computer Lab that are in need of replacement.

We have been fortunate that we have had so much support from our community. Our education has to this point, been a no-cost program its volunteers. I go to the Friends of the library book sale, and they give me the books. We have computers that I believe have been donated. We have those are they are very helpful. And then we have volunteers. I volunteer.

And I think it's extremely important that we not try to do everything. There are agencies here. We have CHANCE, and we have a Supportive Housing. We have these different agencies, and I think of us as a pipeline that we are part of that people move in to our program and then we find the services out in the community so that we are not replicating those and we're supporting, and within the Shelter we also do a lot of collaboration you know.

And that's another advantage that we have because we can be flexible. If people go into a classroom they generally have to be there every day, but often our people have other issues that they need to deal with. So they may be gone on a Tuesday, but we are just going to take rightup Jim where they left off.

Jim Willhight: Tell us about Albany Helping Hands holistic approach.

Pat Loy: One of the things that the Shelter offers is that it hat serves the whole person and so they are doing job training after thrift store or the farm, or they're doing maintenance here at the Shelter, or they are providing all the foodservice. So there's that very practical aspect as well as the academic.

We are working on having internships here. And we need people in all of those areas because I think that somebody who is in business, Education, Human Services, health, communication, they all can learn so much from working with this population.

So I don't think they have something they can get the opportunities to meet so many people in the community through internships and of course, they are so important for our program

Jim Willhight: We have, of course, the GED computer lab here up with somewhat antiquated equipment, we'll talk about that in a little while. But let's talk about the technology GAP for the poor.

Pat Loy: Go to the Community College and take some classes out there that's part of addressing that Technology Gap that so many of us have. They need to go back to school. They have they need to feel confident that they can go out there.

We take everybody. That is one issue is particularly important right now in this state there are I think it's 280,000 adults between the age of 18 and 64 that have not completed high school.

So and there is the last census said about 12,000 people just in the Linn and Benton County areas that do not have GEDs.

And so for those students at we have to start sometimes at the very beginning to develop those academic skills. And so we have that part of our program that prepares them to get a GED. Then we work on transitions so that we might introduce that student to a teacher at Linn-Benton so that they feel more comfortable going out there so will

We look at a independent living skills because we have considerable number of people who are approaching Social Security age. So we have to look at what their needs for achieving Independence. Then we have the people that are in that middle range that have some training and sometimes just need a focus for a particular career.

When I first came to the Shelter, it was when Pastor Bailey was here. I walked into the day-room, and I just sat down, and I would say to somebody on do you have your GED would you be interested in getting your GED.

And then we moved into the chapel, and we had classes there, and then we moved into the boardroom, and now we got a classroom.

Jim Willhight: Pat Loy, the continuing education volunteer here at Albany Helping Hands. Otherwise known as the GED teacher. Thank you very, very much, Pat. It's been a great interview.

The preceding is a transcription of a radio broadcast featuring Pat Loy, Albany Helping Hands, GED/ Continuing Education Volunteer. The interview, conducted by Jim Willhight, AHH Development, and Media Consultant airs on Monday, September 9, 2019, from 9:30 to 10:00 am on 1580 AM, KGAL and KGAL.com. The Podcast (audio in the form of an mp3 file) is available by clicking here.